Information on the process of applying for an SBIR grant from the project pitch to the solicitation and anything in between (and even beyond). Please ask your questions here!

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3 replies, 2 voices Last updated by Profile Photo Lindsay Portnoy 3 months, 3 weeks ago
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  • #20432
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    Lindsay Portnoy
    Participant
    @lindsayportnoy
    1. Pitch your project. NSF’s SBIR process is a bit different this year in that they invite a project pitch before they invite you to submit your full proposal. Submission dates are from March 4-June 13 and June 14-December 12th. More information about what should be included in the 3 page proposal is found here: https://seedfund.nsf.gov/project-pitch/
    2. Write up your proposal. If you are invited to submit, this is the solicitation you must follow to be considered: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf19554

    Logistics, deadlines, and other administrative information is readily available in each of the two above documents. If you’d like to reach out directly to Rajesh to ask questions about how your innovation could best meet the goals of NSF please reach out to him directly at: rmehta@nsf.gov

    Please also feel free to reach out to me (Lindsay) directly or ask questions here and I’ll do my best to answer in a timely manner and THANK YOU for the work you do each day for all of our children!

    #20504
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    Jack Buckley
    Participant
    @jackbuckley

    Is it correct that we have until Dec 14 to craft our 3 page pitch? Or, we can choose to wait until March 4, 2020, when the window opens again?

    Strategically, does it make sense to launch a 3 page proposal by Dec 1, then learn from the feedback what the shortcomings are, and pitch again in March 2020? Do they allow 2 pitches, or even 3? Or, is it one strike and you’re out?

     

    Jack

    #20505
    Profile Photo
    Jack Buckley
    Participant
    @jackbuckley

    Some requirements I’m reading about and wondering about:

    • Market pull: You have evidence that your product or service could meet an important, unmet need for your customers. My Question: what constitutes evidence?
    • Your company must be a small business (fewer than 500 employees) located in the United States.  My Question: Is a non profit a small business?
    • The project’s principal investigator (tech lead) must be legally employed at least 20 hours a week by the company seeking funding. The PI doesn’t need any advanced degrees.  My Question: what constitutes “legally employed” if the non profit in question has volunteers and 1099 independent contractors? Do we need to shift to employee status to be eligible? And how does this work if the applicant is a school? Are schools not eligible? (Don’t need to know in my case; but am wondering on behalf of colleagues. 
    #20532
    Profile Photo
    Lindsay Portnoy
    Participant
    @lindsayportnoy

    Is it correct that we have until Dec 14 to craft our 3 page pitch?

    You have to complete the 3-page pitch before you write the actual grant proposal. By December 13th you will have submitted BOTH the 3-pager AND the full proposal.

    Or, we can choose to wait until March 4, 2020, when the window opens again?

    Completely up to you. If you have an innovation that you’d like to start building towards now then now is the time!

    Strategically, does it make sense to launch a 3 page proposal by Dec 1, then learn from the feedback what the shortcomings are, and pitch again in March 2020?

    The pitch is not the same thing as the proposal. After you submit your pitch you will get a green light (or not) for the full proposal. You also get feedback on your proposal after it is reviewed.

    Do they allow 2 pitches, or even 3? Or, is it one strike and you’re out?

    No limit to submissions.

    Market pull: You have evidence that your product or service could meet an important, unmet need for your customers. My Question: what constitutes evidence?

    Basic due diligence: is there a market (e.g., are folks paying for this type of good or service), and who is currently meeting this need. Evidence: spending (see also: https://marketbrief.edweek.org/marketplace-k-12/k-12-spending-where-the-money-goes/)

    Your company must be a small business (fewer than 500 employees) located in the United States.  My Question: Is a non profit a small business?

    No. A non profit is not the same as a small business. You need a for profit arm or perhaps an L3C.

    The project’s principal investigator (tech lead) must be legally employed at least 20 hours a week by the company seeking funding. The PI doesn’t need any advanced degrees.  My Question: what constitutes “legally employed” if the non profit in question has volunteers and 1099 independent contractors? Do we need to shift to employee status to be eligible? And how does this work if the applicant is a school? Are schools not eligible? (Don’t need to know in my case; but am wondering on behalf of colleagues. 

    There seem to be a few different questions here and they’re nuanced so let me know if I’m not answering them correctly: They want to see that the PI is ‘full time’ at the company. Other personnel (e.g., contractors) do not need to be full time. If you have employees who are contract you’ll need to be specific about the hours they’re working on this initiative versus their regularly contracted work. Schools are not eligible unless they have a way to create a for profit arm.

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